A very thought provoking read in the times suggesting a significant number of suspicious deaths could be regularly overlooked. Does this mean as the sensational headline suggests that “Killers escaping justice because ‘suspicious marks’ get overlooked”.

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/uk/crime/article4641666.ece?shareToken=1b6f65ca2f16175fc54274343d249019

The article quotes from a Home Office report so there does seem to be some validity to it which is worrying and there potentially justifies the sensational headline. However the question is what could be causing this:

Could it be related to skills and knowledge, with training not sufficiently equipping officers to recognise where Forensics Pathology examination is required or is it down to the ever present dark subject of cost and budget costs?

The article states that “Two senior officers said that “finance is a consideration when asking for a forensic post-mortem”.” Whilst easy to read what you like from such a comment, does it suggest budget cuts are leading to “killers escaping justice”.

If this is the case, is it time to start looking at more modern solutions to ensure Forensic Pathology examinations can be carried out at reduced costs?

We recently met a company specialising in digital autopsies, where bodies are are scanned, providing data that can completely avoid the need for autopsies altogether. Due to the relatively low cost of this procedure, potentially all bodies in ‘un-explainable’ deaths could be scanned and analysed at a fraction of the cost, highlighting the ones that need further investigation. This also provided images / data that can be analysis time and time again without having to go back to the body, great for when new evidence comes to light in the future.

We feel there is huge potential in this technology and for that reason we are looking to work closely with iGene, if you want to know more about such technologies get in touch.

For more information about digital autopsy’s – click here